Press Release

NASA, NOAA to Announce 2018 Global Temperatures, Climate Conditions

Posted on Updated on

Media Advisory: M19-003
NASA, NOAA to Announce 2018 Global Temperatures, Climate Conditions

 

2017_Worldwide_Temperature_Map.jpg
NASA and NOAA are two keepers of the world’s temperature data and independently produce a record of Earth’s surface temperatures and changes. Shown here are 2017 global temperature data: higher than normal temperatures are shown in red, lower than normal temperatures are shown in blue. Credits: NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio

 

Climate experts from NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) will provide the annual release of global temperatures data and discuss the most important climate trends of 2018 during a media teleconference at 11:30 a.m. EST Wednesday, Feb. 6.

 

Read the rest of this entry »

Media Invited to See NASA’s Orion Crew Module for its Journey to Mars

Posted on Updated on

January 20, 2016
MEDIA ADVISORY M16-005

*** NOTE: Press release are usually published under that page “Media Releases (Information for Journalist).” These press releases are usually meetings or presentation of studies. The public will most of the time have access to view or listen to most of these, but only credentialed media can ask question.

Also, before the meeting documentation may be made available, sometimes weeks before the meeting. If the documents are embargoed, we in the press know that means the information cannot be published before the embargo date and time. We use the time to pre-write our stories and prepare questions, but the embargo must be honored by all.

–  George McGinn, Examining Life (And Things of Interest), Daily Defense News and Cosmology and Space Exploration news websites.


Orion’s pressure vessel was completed Jan. 13, 2016 at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans. The pressure vessel is the spacecraft’s underlying structure on which all of the spacecraft’s systems and subsystems are built and integrated. (Credit: NASA)

 

NASA’s Orion crew module will be available to media at two NASA locations Jan. 26th and in early February, as engineers continue to prepare the spacecraft to send astronauts deeper into space than ever before, including to an asteroid placed in lunar orbit and on the journey to Mars.

At 10:30 a.m. EST on Tuesday, Jan. 26, the agency’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans will host a media viewing and facility tour of the spacecraft’s recently completed pressure vessel, the underlying structure of the crew module, before it ships to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

To attend the event at Michoud, reporters must contact Chip Howat at 504-257-0478 or carl.j.howat@nasa.gov by 3 p.m. Monday, Jan. 25. International media accreditation for this event is closed.

The Orion pressure vessel provides a sealed environment for astronaut life support in future human-rated crew modules. Technicians at Michoud began welding together the seven large aluminum pieces of Orion’s primary structure in precise detail last September. At Kennedy, Orion will be outfitted with the spacecraft’s systems and subsystems, processed and integrated with NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) ahead of their first joint exploration mission, or EM-1.

Michoud also is where the massive core stage of SLS is being manufactured. Reporters will be able to view tooling and newly manufactured hardware for SLS, and hear about mission progress from personnel across NASA.

Individuals available for interviews during the tour include:

  • Bill Hill, deputy associate administrator for Exploration Systems Development at NASA Headquarters in Washington
  • Mike Sarafin, EM-1 mission manager at NASA Headquarters
  • Mark Kirasich, Orion program manager at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston
  • Scott Wilson, Orion production manager at Kennedy
  • John Honeycutt, SLS program manager at the agency’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama
  • Steve Doering, SLS core stage manager at Marshall
  • Mike Bolger, Ground Systems Development and Operations program manager at Kennedy
  • NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio
  • Mike Hawes, Orion program manager for Lockheed Martin
  • Jim Bray, crew module director for Lockheed Martin 

Orion will depart Michoud on or about Feb. 1 and travel to Kennedy aboard NASA’s Super Guppy airplane. Additional details for Orion’s arrival at Kennedy, including media accreditation, are forthcoming.

For more information about Orion, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/orion

-end- 

 

NASA Releases Press Release Looking for Applications for Future Mars Mission

Posted on Updated on

IMG_3927Story written by George McGinn
Cosmology and Space Exploration News

Want to become an astronaut to visit Mars?

Today, NASA put out a press release with information on how to apply to become an astronaut for the future manned flight to Mars.

Normally these just go into the page for Media Releases. But this is a good time to tell you that I have created a new page called:

below is the beginning of the press release. The link after it takes you to our new Media page.

While many options such as asking questions and getting access to their teleconference systems, with most press releases, if a meeting or a panel is conviened, NASA will allow the public to view it live either on its website or on NASA TV.

Each press release has all the information you need to watch and listen to the questions the press ask and the respones they get.

The link to the new page is: Media Releases (Information For Journalists)

This page is also available and lists below it with “–” showing the releases available. Click on the 3 lines in the upper right corner to see all the pages we have and to access all the press releases we get.

Here is the first two paragraph of the press release asking for applications to anyone who thinks they can become an astronaut. Good luck to anyone applying.
“In anticipation of returning human spaceflight launches to American soil, and in preparation for the agency’s journey to Mars, NASA announced it will soon begin accepting applications for the next class of astronaut candidates. With more human spacecraft in development in the United States today than at any other time in history, future astronauts will launch once again from the Space Coast of Florida on American-made commercial spacecraft, and carry out deep-space exploration missions that will advance a future human mission to Mars.

The agency will accept applications from Dec. 14 through mid-February and expects to announce candidates selected in mid-2017. Applications for consideration as a NASA Astronaut will be accepted at…”